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Transformers guard Montenegro’s capital, China war games disrupt flights, Ford fest controversy in Toronto, Eid Al-Fitr celebrations due to…

Get the best travel news here curated by Lonely Planet Destination Editors, who use their expertise to bring you the stories that matter from all over the world. In today’s edition: Giant Transformers sculptures guard the capital of Montenegro, war games in China are set to disrupt flight paths, Ford fest in Toronto kicks off with controversy and many Muslim countries are preparing to celebrate Eid Al-Fitr. Europe Asia & the Pacific The Americas Middle East & Africa YOUR WORLD TODAY 28 July is… Commemoration of the Great Upheaval, Nova Scotia, Canada Liberation Day, San Marino Fiestas Patrias, Peru Eid Al-Fitr (in most Muslim countries). Eid Mubarak! EUROPE Stories curated by Lonely Planet’s Europe Destination Editors: Jo Cooke, James Smart, Brana Vladisavljevic, Kate Morgan, Anna Tyler and Gemma Graham Podgorica town square, Montenegro. Image by Charlie / CC BY 2.0 Huge Transformers sculptures guard Montenegro’s capital Montenegro’s capital Continue reading

Podgorica has a new attraction in the main city square. Huge robots (some of which are up to 14m tall) have been created by a local 22-year-old sculptor named Danilo Baletic and are part of an exhibition called ‘Transformers defending Podgorica’. The sculptures are inspired by the famous cartoon series and constructed from scrap metal. Read more: metro.co.uk  Bulgarian archaeologists discover the ‘Vampire of Vratsa’ Archaeologists have discovered what is claimed to be a medieval vampire burial site in Bulgaria. The discovery was made during excavations of an ancient fortress near the town of Vratsa. The site, which dates back to Thracian times, includes a Roman fortress, a medieval village and the grave of an older man who was 1.8m tall, which is considered unusual for that period. The archaeologists believe the body has clear signs of rituals against vampirism, with a white stone placed on the left side of the chest and its feet tied together. Read more: sofiaglobe.com Major exhibition of works by ‘Il Veronese’ in Verona There is a major exhibition of works by Renaissance artist Paolo Caliari, known as ‘Il Veronese’ in his home town of Verona. Around one hundred artworks by the painter including the newly restored ‘Feast in the House of Levi’ are on display in the city’s Palazzo della Gran Guardia in Piazza Bra. Read more: italymagazine.com The opulent gardens of Villa Garzoni. Image by Nature And / CC BY 2.0 Villa that inspired ‘Pinocchio’ on sale for £150 million The spectacular villa in Tuscany where the author of Pinocchio, Carlo Lorenzini, spent his childhood is up for sale for around £150 million. The five-storey palace has over 40 bedrooms, is decorated with frescos by major artists and sits in elaborate baroque style gardens. The sellers are seeking a foreign investor who may be able to realise the Pinocchio-related touristic potential of the estate. Read more: dailymail.co.uk Seville passes noise reduction laws A series of new regulations have been passed in Seville to limit noise disruption for residents. Under the new laws, bars will not be allowed to show events on televisions set up outside or serve drinks to people standing on the street. People having conversations considered unreasonably loud or playing music from their car will also face the threat of a fine. Read more: theguardian.com €1,650 per person Ibiza restaurant opens A new restaurant has opened in Ibiza that charges €1,650 for a three hour ‘dining experience’. The restaurant designed by Michelin-starred chef Paco Roncero is designed to take diners around the world with a 360º screen changing location with each new dish. If the restaurant is successful, the chef hopes to turn it into a franchise. Read more: elpais.com  Gatwick ‘resourcing issues’ leave passengers without luggage London’s Gatwick Airport has apologised after hundreds of passengers were left without their luggage. Baggage handling company Swissport had ‘resourcing issues’ on Sunday meaning some travellers had to wait hours for their bags and others left the airport without them. It’s the second time this summer that Gatwick has suffered baggage delays. Read more: bbc.co.uk  Milstatt will host the next dining experience. Image by John Menard / CC BY-SA 2.0 New pop-up forest dining experiences in Austria A new collaboration between Fedlküche (Field Kitchen) and Austria’s Forestry Commission means pop-up forest dining experiences are being introduced around the country. The pop-ups will be located in some of Austria’s most stunning lakes and forest spots and aims to show that the forest can yield culinary delights. Read more: thelocal.at Mayor blasts US tourist for being ‘irresponsible’ on France’s Mont Blanc The mayor of French Alps’ town, St Gervais, has expressed his outrage at a US tourist who took his children, aged nine and eleven, climbing on the notoriously dangerous Mont Blanc. The father was hoping to break a world record with his children, but they ended up being caught in an avalanche before reaching the summit. Authorities are trying to get the message across to tourists that this is a serious mountain and not to be taken lightly. Read more: france24.com World’s oldest message in a bottle auctioned on eBay A message in a bottle, thought to be the world’s oldest, is currently being auctioned on eBay. The 101 year-old bottle, containing a postcard destined for Berlin, was discovered by a fisherman in the waters off Kiel, Germany in March. The bottle had attracted a bid of €3,500 on Monday but will remain on display at the Internationales Maritimes Museum in Hamburg until January 2015. Read more: thelocal.de ASIA & THE PACIFIC Stories curated by Lonely Planet’s Asia & the Pacific Destination Editors: Megan Eaves, Sarah Reid, Joe Bindloss, Laura Crawford and Tasmin Waby. Planes re-routed to avoid military exercises along China’s southern coast. Image by Frank Kovalchek / CC BY 2.0 China war games to disrupt flights Flights over China’s southern coast will be disrupted starting on Tuesday as the government has announced it will conduct a series of military exercises in the region. Flights will be rerouted along alternative air paths and several sections of airspace will be protected for commercial flight paths. Read more: abcnews.go.com First Hard Rock Café coming to Central Asia Kazakhstan will soon be home to Central Asia’s first Hard Rock Café. The restaurant will be located in the former capital city of Almaty and is expected to open in October with its usual rock ‘n’ roll-themed decor. Hard Rock Café currently operates 175 restaurants in 53 countries around the world. Read more: inform.kz Tensions high after clashes in Saharanpur Tensions remain high in the Indian city of Saharanpur in Uttar Pradesh following clashes between Sikhs and Muslims at the weekend. A city-wide curfew was briefly relaxed today, but restrictions will be reimposed from 7pm with police operating a ‘shoot on sight’ policy on the streets. Three people were killed and 33 injured during inter-communal riots on Saturday. Read more: timesofindia.indiatimes.com K2 conquered by Pakistani climbers. Image by Maria Ly / CC BY 2.0 Pakistani climbers finally conquer Pakistan’s highest mountain A team of Pakistani climbers has finally conquered K2 in Pakistan on the 60th anniversary of the first ascent. Climbing the world’s second highest mountain has been an ambition for Pakistan since 1954 and the successful ascent was aided by an unusually long ‘weather window’ of clear conditions at the summit over the weekend. Read more: tribune.com.pk Darwin’s ‘drunk’ tour guide faces court Tourism businesses in Darwin are annoyed by the antics of one rogue guide who reportedly turned up drunk to tour a group of eight visitors. The driver was apprehended by police and had was more than four times the legal limit for driving in Australia. Read more: abc.net.au Push for more visitor-friendly ATMs in Japan The Japanese government plans to call on local banks to modernise their ATMs so that more visitors are able to withdraw cash with foreign cards. The push comes as part of the campaign to improve tourist services prior to the 2020 Olympic Games in Tokyo. Currently only a limited number of ATMs in Japan accept international cards. Read more: japantimes.co.jp THE AMERICAS Stories curated by Lonely Planet’s Americas Destination Editors: Clifton Wilkinson, Dora Whitaker, Alex Howard and MaSovaida Morgan. Toronto’s old and new city halls. Image by The City of Toronto / CC BY 2.0 Ford Fest kicks off with controversy Event organizers for this weekend’s Ford Fest in Toronto have apologised for confrontations that occurred between LGBT activists and supporters of Rob Ford, the city’s divisive mayor. The demonstrators arrived at the festival on Friday carrying signs that called for the mayor’s resignation and a number of Ford supporters got into verbal confrontations with the activists. Sarah Thompson, another candidate for mayor, also arrived at the festival riding a white horse. Read more: cbc.ca Washington DC’s new Silver Line metro finally opens It’s been fifty years in the planning and has so far exceeded its original budget by $150 million, but on Saturday Washington DC’s new Silver Line metro finally opened to the public. The line will eventually provide public transport between downtown DC and Dulles International Airport, but for now five new stations – four in Tysons Corner and one in Reston – have opened along 11.7 miles of track. A bus service will continue the service to the airport until the rest of the line opens by 2018. Read more: washingtonpost.com Yellow cabs make way for the pink mustache. Image by Raido / CC BY 2.0 Lyft launches in New York with added regulations for drivers The pink moustachioed ride-sharing service, Lyft, launched in New York City on Friday but with a number of regulations for drivers. After negotiations with the NYC Taxi and Limousine Commission (TLC), the start-up has agreed that its drivers must abide by certain rules including being licenced by the TLC, paying the licence fee of US$243, having their fingerprints taken and getting their vehicles checked six times in a two-year period. The service launched in the five boroughs on Friday with 500 drivers. Read more: bloomberg.com Saint’s remains return to Hawaii The remains of St. Marianne will return to Hawaii on Sunday. As the second saint from the islands to be canonized by the Catholic Church, St. Marianne’s remains will be kept at the Cathedral of Our Lady of Peace in Honolulu. A formal ceremony will be held at the cathedral on Thursday. Read more: kitv.com MIDDLE EAST & AFRICA Stories curated by Lonely Planet’s Middle East and Africa Destination Editors: Matt Phillips and Helen Elfer. Abu Dhabi in the UAE, one of many countries celebrating Eid al-Fitr. Image by Shenli Leong / CC BY 2.0 Eid Al-Fitr celebrations in many Muslim countries The end of the holy month of Ramadan, Eid al-Fitr, is being celebrated in most Muslim countries on Monday including Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, the UAE, Egypt and Lebanon. Oman, Morocco and others will celebrate on Tuesday as the date is determined by the sighting of the new Shawwal moon. Traditionally Eid al Fitr is celebrated by family gatherings and feasting. Read more: worldbulletin.net  Mozambique strictly enforcing visa regulations Visitors to Mozambique are no longer able to acquire visas upon arrival if there is Mozambique consular representation in their home country. This is an existing regulation but it has not been enforced historically. The tightening of enforcement guidelines has seen many tourists being deported shortly after their arrival in the country…

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Wreckage from missing Air Algérie plane found in Mali, seven-year-old cycles from Sweden to Berlin and Southern California swelters amid…

Get the best travel news here curated by Lonely Planet Destination Editors, who use their expertise to bring you the stories that matter from all over the world. In today’s edition: Air Algérie wreckage discovered in Mali by French military, a seven-year-old Swedish boy cycles to Berlin with his family and drought conditions worsen in Southern California. Europe Asia & the Pacific The Americas Middle East & Africa Weird, odd & just plain fun YOUR WORLD TODAY 25 July is… Constitution Day, Puerto Rico Guanacaste Day, Costa Rica Republic Day, Tunisia EUROPE Stories curated by Lonely Planet’s Europe Destination Editors: Jo Cooke, James Smart, Brana Vladisavljevic, Kate Morgan, Anna Tyler and Gemma Graham A lighthouse peers out from Skellig Michael. Image by psyberartist / CC BY 2.0 New Star Wars scenes being shot at Skellig Michael Filming for the new Star Wars film is taking place at Skellig Michael, off Ireland’s west coast. The remote rock, home to a monastery reached by rock-carved steps, will be closed to the public July 28–30  while the scenes are shot. It’s Continue reading

hoped the resulting exposure will encourage tourists to visit the UNESCO site. Read more: independent.ie Turkey’s high speed train opens Friday The delayed high speed train line between Istanbul and Ankara will open on Friday. Capable of reaching speeds of 250 km per hour, the train line will cut the journey time between the two cities to 3.5 hours. There will be 6 journeys per day each way, 12 in total. Prices are yet to be confirmed, but are expected to be around 75 Turkish Lira per journey. Read more: hurriyetdailynews.com Cracks appear on Grand Bazaar’s roof Aerial photos of the roof of Istanbul’s Grand Bazaar have revealed serious cracks following heavy rain last week. Steel supports were introduced to parts of the 553-year old roof following damage two years ago, but the problem is thought to have worsened over the past week. In March a full restoration of the roof was announced, costing 200,000,000 lira. Read more: hurriyetdailynews.com  Semi-submarine, Croatia. Image by Connie Ma / CC BY-SA 2.0 Croatian semi-submarine company a success Tourists can now experience Croatia’s underwater world without getting their feet wet, thanks to the success of a local company that manufactures semi-submarines. Twenty-five of the submarine-shaped red boats, which float low in the water with an underwater glass-walled cabin have been sold to operators up and down the coastline. Read more: croatiaweek.com Feast of St Andrew to be celebrated in Pescara This Sunday the Feast of St Andrew will be marked by a unique land and sea celebration in the Italian coastal town of Pescara. A statue of St Andrew is carried, followed by a band and a procession, through the town down to the harbour, where it is transferred onto a fishing boat. The procession – accompanied by a flotilla of fishing vessels – continues out to the centre of the harbour, where floral wreaths are thrown into the water in memory of those who have died at sea. Read more: italymagazine.com New Russian law allows gambling zones in Sochi and Crimea A new Russian law, published on Wednesday, permits the establishment of gambling zones in Sochi and Crimea. In Sochi, casinos can be set up only in Olympic venues constructed through private funding. In Crimea the authorities are free to choose the locations for casinos. Read more: themoscowtimes.com Commonwealth Games’ tickets sold out. Image by Linda Connon / CC BY 2.0 Seeing the Commonwealth Games without a ticket Most tickets for Glasgow’s Commonwealth Games, which feature 71 nations and a wide variety of sports from athletics and swimming to lawn bowls, are sold out. There are various other ways to join the action, including big screens, festivals and workshops. Events that are free to watch include a flotilla of 250 vessels, which will sail down the River Clyde on Saturday, the marathon (July 27) and road cycling (July 31 and Aug 3). Read more: bbc.co.uk Brussels’ Royal Palace opens to the public The Palais Royal (Royal Palace) in Brussels opens its doors to the public for a short period every year over summer and this year it is open from July 22 to September 7. The 19th-century palace is the ‘official residence’ of the royal family and will be open from 10:30am to 4:30pm every day, except Monday. Read more: visitbrussels.be Berlin climbs the tourist charts Figures released this week show that Berlin is the fastest growing tourist city in Europe. The study compared overnight stays in 115 cities, with Berlin showing an 8% increase in visitor numbers, year on year. The head of Visit Berlin, Burkhard Kieker, attributed the growth to the city’s history, tolerance, and the fact it ‘doesn’t cost the earth’. London remained in the top spot for 2014, with Paris sticking firmly in second. Read more: thelocal.de ASIA & THE PACIFIC Stories curated by Lonely Planet’s Asia & the Pacific Destination Editors: Megan Eaves, Sarah Reid, Joe Bindloss, Laura Crawford and Tasmin Waby.   Vientiane, next in line for the Google Street View treatment. Image by goflashpacker / CC BY 2.0 Laos to get Google Street View Laos will be the next country in Southeast Asia to receive the Google Street View treatment, with work to begin soon in Vientiane. The government has reportedly encouraged the public to ‘keep the area nice and clean’ so Laos is showcased positively to the world. Read more: shanghaidaily.com Bangkok hosts ‘happiness’ festival Parts of central Bangkok will be closed off this weekend for what the Tourism Authority of Thailand Governor, Thawatchai Arunyik, has dubbed ‘the mother of all bounce-back parties’. Featuring music concerts, cultural displays, exhibits and food stalls, the free Thailand Happiness Street Festival will run from Saturday until Sunday, 3pm-midnight. Read more: tatnews.org  Air India’s troubled Dreamliners Air India, the national carrier of India, has had more problems with its new fleet of Boeing Dreamliner aircraft. Two flights had to be cancelled on Thursday due to technical problems with the planes, including doors that would not close properly. There were two cancellations last week after similar problems had occurred. Read more: timesofindia.indiatimes.com Kiwi ski-season social media marketing campaign using drones In an innovative tourism marketing campaign, travellers in New Zealand this winter are invited to make use of Tourism New Zealand drones to film short clips of themselves on snow-capped mountains and encouraged to share them via social media channels to inspire others to travel to the South Island of New Zealand. Read more: mumbrella.com.au Tourist arrivals from US and UK to Australia on the rise While the biggest market for inbound travellers to Australia is Asia, visitors from the US and UK have gained ground in the last 12 months partly due to the economic recovery of these two large markets. It’s been reported that arrivals from the UK grew 12% for the year while US arrivals grew by 9.1%. Read more: thenewdaily.com.au THE AMERICAS Stories curated by Lonely Planet’s Americas Destination Editors: Clifton Wilkinson, Dora Whitaker, Alex Howard and MaSovaida Morgan. Mexico gears up for F1. Image by ph-stop / CC BY-SA 2.0 Mexico revs up for return of F1 After a 23 year gap, Formula 1 motor racing is to return to Mexico. Officials have announced that the Autodromo Hermanos Rodriguez, in the capital Mexico City, will host Grand Prix races again for five years from next year…

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Algerian airliner missing with 116 on board, Norway’s chief of intelligence warns of imminent terror threat, China plans extension of…

Get the best travel news here curated by Lonely Planet Destination Editors, who use their expertise to bring you the stories that matter from all over the world. In today’s edition: Air Algérie flight disappears from radar en route from Burkina Faso to Algiers, Norwegian terror chief warns of ‘imminent’ attack, Morocco builds an electric fence along its Algerian border, China plans  extension of a controversial railway line and Airbnb tenant refuses to leave apartment. Europe Asia & the Pacific The Americas Middle East & Africa Weird, odd & just plain fun YOUR WORLD TODAY 24 July is… Laylat al-Qadr, the Night of Destiny, celebrated by Muslims everywhere Simón Bolívar Day, in Bolivia, Venezuela, Ecuador, and Colombia Pioneer Day, Utah, USA EUROPE Stories curated by Lonely Planet’s Europe Destination Editors: Jo Cooke, James Smart, Brana Vladisavljevic, Kate Morgan, Anna Tyler and Gemma Graham Continue reading

Norway on terror alert. Image by Julian-G. Albert / CC BY 2.0 Terrorist attack against Norway ‘imminent’ Benedicte Bjoernland, the head of PST, Norway’s  intelligence service, has announced they have received ‘reliable information’ that terrorists with links to Islamist groups in Syria are planning an attack on the country ‘within days’. He added that no specific target has been identified. Read more: abcnews.go.com Rude grandmother rests before war memorial parade A giant grandmother who smokes, spits and releases vanilla-scented farts has proved a major attraction in Liverpool. The 7.5m-tall marionette has been ‘sleeping’ in St George’s Hall, but will start to breathe before joining a giants’ parade from Friday to Sunday. The parade is part of the Memories of August 1914 show, which honours Liverpool’s involvement in WWI. Read more: bbc.co.uk Loud Americans banned from Kerry cafe A cafe in County Kerry has sparked outrage by banning coach parties and ‘loud Americans’. Peter’s Place in Waterville, part of the picturesque Ring of Kerry, has a sign in its window reading ‘No bus/coach parties or loud Americans’. The notice has been shared on Twitter but no one from the cafe has commented so far. Almost a million Americans visited Ireland last year. Read more: dailymail.co.uk New legislation proposes easier long-term visa applications for France France has unveiled a new legislation that aims to reduce the hassles foreigners face when applying for long-term stays in the country. The bill, if passed, will mean the antiquated sections of France’s immigration system will be overhauled making it easier for people. The key points for expats include a multi-year visa being extended from one to four years and one skilled workers visa, a ‘talent passport’, to replace the various visas currently needed. Read more: thelocal.fr Outdoor screening, Parc de la Villette. Image by Pascal Terjan / CC BY-SA 2.0 Outdoor cinema kicks off in Paris The annual Cinéma en Plein Air (open-air cinema) in Paris’ Parc de la Villette in the north kicked off its season on Wednesday. This year’s theme focuses on adolescence and the nostalgia of childhood. Check out the full programme on www.villette.com. Read more: parisianescapades.com WWI documents go online ahead of 100th anniversary More than 700,000 rare photos, documents and letters relating to WWI have been uploaded to Germany’s Federal Archive, ahead of the 100th anniversary of the conflict, which began on July 28 1914. Access to all personal and military documentation is free, and the collection includes letters written to and from soldiers serving in the conflict. Read more: thelocal.de Inter-city bus tickets to be sold at kiosks in Croatia Purchasing tickets for Croatia’s inter-city buses is about to become easier, as they will soon be available to buy from over 1,300 Tisak-branded kiosks located around the country. The kiosks recently began diversifying their business, and offer other useful services such as photocopying, cash withdrawals and car-parking tickets. Read more: croatiaweek.com Romania to host first European Fair of Castles Romania will host the first European Fair of Castles in May 2015 and the fair will be held at Corvin Castle in Hunedoara, Transylvania. Museums, palaces, castles and fortresses from around Europe are invited to take part in the event, and so far there are six confirmed participants, from Hungary, Spain and Romania itself. Read more: romania-insider.com Open Street theatre performances held in Moscow during summer As part of the city government’s initiative called ‘the Best City in the World’, Moscow theatres are offering free street performances during summer. The shows take place on major squares and pedestrian streets in central Moscow. Other free events, such as dance lessons, will also be organised. Read more: themoscowtimes.com Pilot whales off the coast of Tenerife. Image by Tony Hisgett / CC BY 2.0 Demands for whale sanctuary off Canary Islands Conservationist groups have called for a whale and dolphin sanctuary to be created off the Canary Islands just months before oil drilling is due to start in the area…

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Tel Aviv flights cancelled in Gaza crisis, Commonwealth Games begin in Glasgow, Chinese town in lockdown after plague death and NYPD stumped by white…

Get the best travel news here curated by Lonely Planet Destination Editors, who use their expertise to bring you the stories that matter from all over the world. In today’s edition: US and European carriers cancel flights in and out of Israel, Glasgow’s Commonwealth Games are expected to attract an audience of 1 billion, the Chinese town of Yumen has been placed under quarantine following a man’s death from bubonic plague and the NYPD are investigating the appearance of mysterious white flags on Brooklyn Bridge. Europe Asia & the Pacific The Americas Middle East & Africa Weird, odd & just plain fun YOUR WORLD TODAY 23 July is … Haile Selassie’s Birthday, celebrated by Rastafarians everywhere Renaissance Day, Oman Revolution Day, Egypt EUROPE Stories curated by Lonely Planet’s Europe Destination Editors: Jo Cooke, James Smart, Brana Vladisavljevic, Kate Morgan, Anna Tyler and Gemma Graham Rooftops of Catalonia. Image by Scott Wylie / CC BY 2.0 Record tourist numbers visit Spain in 2014 A record-breaking 28 million international tourists visited Spain in the first half of 2014, an increase of more than 7% on the equivalent 6 months last year. Spain continues to be the most popular destination for British tourists, with 6.5 million visitors between January and June. The most popular region was Catalonia. Read more: elpais.com Commonwealth Games bring Rod Stewart and Usain Bolt to Glasgow The 2014 Commonwealth Games begin in Glasgow on Wednesday evening. A global audience of over a billion is expected to watch the opening ceremony, which features Rod Stewart, Susan Boyle and Sir Alex Ferguson. Usain Bolt and Mo Farah star among athletes from 71 nations associated with the former British Empire. England, Scotland, Australia, India and South Africa feature, alongside smaller nations including Nauru and Malta. Read more: heraldscotland.com Denmark’s new sea pool isn’t making waves A new sea pool in Nørre Vorupør in northern Jutland, Denmark, has turned a previously dangerous swimming spot into a safe place for visitors to take a dip. The area is hugely popular with tourists but rip currents and high waves in the waters have meant that, up until now, swimming has been risky. The local council hopes the new 50m x 50m pool, which opened this week and has a mechanism to block waves, will encourage more visitors to the area. Read more: icenews.is Plans for history-themed amusement park in Moscow Russian billionaire Konstantin Malofeev is planning to create a Russian-history-themed amusement park in Moscow. The estimated cost of this project is 18 million roubles (US$514 million). The location of the 300-hectare park is still unconfirmed, but it should be completed within three years. Read more: calvertjournal.com Abandoned Athens airport to become a coastal resort Hellenikon, the old Athens airport which has been abandoned since 2001, is reportedly set to become a seaside resort. The 620-hectare complex will include hotels, a marina, a kilometre-long beach and a huge park. The project, worth 7 billion euros, is planned to begin in 2016 and it’s estimated that it will take 15 to 20 years to complete.  Read more: uk.reuters.com Cinque Terre, Italy. Image by Daniel Stockman / CC BY-SA 2.0 Ancient Roman shipwreck found off the coast of Italy An ancient Roman shipwreck containing hundreds of amphorae has been discovered near the Cinque Terre area in northern Italy. The 15-metre-long ship dates from the second century BC and was found by a sonar engineer. Read more: italymagazine.com ASIA & THE PACIFIC Stories curated by Lonely Planet’s Asia & the Pacific Destination Editors: Megan Eaves, Sarah Reid, Joe Bindloss, Laura Crawford and Tasmin Waby. Gansu Province, China. Image by apercoco / CC BY-SA 2.0 Chinese town sealed off after man dies of bubonic plague The 30,000 residents of Yumen, in China’s Gansu province, have been forced to stay put following confirmation that a local man died of the bubonic plague. A further 151 people have been placed under quarantine, but no further cases of the rare but highly infectious disease have been recorded. Read more: channelnewsasia.com Qantas flights to the Great Barrier Reef Qantas has brought back direct services from Sydney to the Great Barrier Reef, complementing low-cost carrier Jetstar’s existing Hamilton Island  service. Qantas Domestic chief exec, Lyell Strambi said their customers wanted a leisure service to the Whitsundays that included checked luggage and inflight meals. Read more: breakingtravelnews.com Bush Blitz study unearths new Australian plant and animal species A government and industry funded nature-study program has been extended for another three years after so far analysing 700 new species of plant and animals in Australia’s remote bush. Discoveries include a fish that lives in the water atop waterfalls in the Northern Territory, a species of wolf spider that walks on water in the Kimberley and a new type of native truffle in Mildura, Victoria. Read more: guardian.com Typhoon knocks out Taipei’s city bike scheme. Image by davidreid / CC BY-SA 2.0 Typhoon Matmo causes travel problems for Taiwan Travellers were affected on Wednesday as Typhoon Matmo hit Taiwan. Most stores closed and Taipei’s city bike scheme remained out of service, while thousands were left stranded due to cancelled and delayed flights across the region. The storm was expected to hit southeast China by early Thursday and bring tropical rain to north Asia for the rest of the week. Read more: wantchinatimes.com Indian basketball players forced to play without turbans Sikh basketball players from the Indian national team were forced to play without their turbans at the International Basketball Federation championship in Wuhan, after the Chinese hosts imposed a summary ban on headgear. Wearing a turban is one of the integral tenets of the Sikh religion, alongside the wearing of shorts, the carrying of a comb, steel bangle and dagger, and having uncut hair. Read more: timesofindia.indiatimes.com Bus dispute strands travellers in Nepal A dispute between bus companies over the allocation of routes has left many travellers stranded in eastern Nepal. …

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Sweden issues heatwave warning, Beyoncé honoured at Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Indian pilots grounded in alcohol spot checks

Get the best travel news here curated by Lonely Planet Destination Editors, who use their expertise to bring you the stories that matter from all over the world. In today’s edition: Sweden issues Class 1 weather warning, Beyoncé set for  Rock and Roll Hall of Fame award, Jordanian arts festival donates money to Gazan orphans and  99 Indian pilots grounded in alcohol spot checks since 2011. Europe Asia & the Pacific The Americas Middle East & Africa YOUR WORLD TODAY 22 July is… Pi Approximation Day, celebrated by mathematicians and lovers of the number 3.14159265359 everywhere Revolution Day, the Gambia EUROPE Stories curated by Lonely Planet’s Europe Destination Editors: Jo Cooke, James Smart, Brana Vladisavljevic, Kate Morgan, Anna Tyler and Gemma Graham Prado museum, Madrid. Image by alicia bramlett / CC BY 2.0 Prado museum loses 885 artworks Madrid’s Prado Museum has misplaced 885 works of art, according to a recent audit. The museum suspects that many artworks were lost during the Spanish Civil War or in the merging of the Prado and Trinidad museum collections in the 19th century, but museum documents cannot confirm this. Spain’s Audit Court has recommended that the Prado create a logging system to track artworks lent to other institutions. Read more: elpais.com Swedish heatwave prompts first warning Soaring temperatures in Sweden have prompted the Swedish weather agency, SMHI, to issue its first ever Class 1 warning over high temperatures in the country. To justify a Class 1 warning, daytime temperatures must exceed 30ºC for three days in a row or more, bringing risks to public health. The north of the country is most affected, with the warning applying to Västernorrland, Västerbotten and Norrbotten. Read more: thelocal.se Adventure park opens in Sochi Sochi has a new tourist attraction, the AJ Hackett Skypark Sochi, which opened to visitors on July 1. The park offers various extreme adventures, including Russia’s highest bungee jumping and a suspended pedestrian walkway claimed to be the worlds highest (207m) and longest (550m).  Read more: sochi-travel.info  Plans for Iron Curtain bike trail revealed. Image by Fabricio Zuardi / CC BY 2.0 Iron Curtain bike trail planned Plans have been unveiled for a 6,800km bicycle trail following the route of the former Iron Curtain. The border divided eastern and western Europe for nearly 50 years, and the route will run from the Norwegian-Russian border to the Black Sea. The plans aim to promote ‘European culture, history and sustainable tourism’. Read more: thelocal.no Prehistoric tomb has mind-altering acoustic properties Scientists studying the Hal Saflieni Hypogeum in Malta have found that the shape of the necropolis is designed to boost the acoustics of certain frequencies of sound waves, meaning that deep male voices produce echoes that last several seconds. Tests have shown that exposure to sound waves at these frequencies can have an effect on brain function similar to meditation. Read more: independent.com.mt Street fishing: the new craze in Paris In the 19th-century, the Seine was populated by fishermen and now a new wave of urban ‘street fishers’ have started flocking to Paris’ waterways. It’s proving popular with young people as well as tourists who have reported catching giant catfish, black bass and pike. You can now get an online map of the best fishing spots around the city. Read more: thelocal.fr Greek company offers new service for travel with kids A company in Greece is offering a new service for families travelling with with babies and young kids. It rents out baby and toddler equipment and sells childcare products, and everything is ready upon a family’s arrival to their accommodation in Greece. The service, called My Baby in Greece, is currently available in Athens, Thessaloniki and Crete. Read more: news.gtp.gr Anyone for cricket? Image by fdecomite / CC BY 2.0 Icelandic insect bars go into production Two Icelandic entrepreneurs have started making energy bars from insects. Their first effort, dubbed Crowbar, uses cricket flour alongside almond, coconut and cacao. A 2013 UN report suggested that insects, which are high on protein and calcium and are a sustainable food source, should be an increasing part of our diets. The pair plan to expand into other insect-infused food products. Read more: icenews.is Record year for British jellyfish 2014 is shaping up to be a record year for Britain’s jellyfish population. Recent mild winters and warm summers have seen ever increasing number of the animals, with scientists hailing Wales as a particular hotspot. Barrel, blue, moon and lion’s mane jellyfish are the most common species – most are harmless, although the lion’s mane’s sting can be painful. bbc.co.uk Italy’s beaches patrolled by lifeguard dogs This summer Italy’s beaches will be patrolled by over 350 dogs trained by the Italian School for Rescue Dogs to perform water rescues. The dogs work alongside the coast guard and have saved hundreds of lives over the years, including many children. Read more: ansa.it How much is a hotel in Paris worth? You decide. A new initiative set up in Paris allows customers to pay what they want for a room at a select group of five hotels, with the aim of giving a voice back to the customer. Bookings need to be made via the ‘pay what you want’ website  (in French only) and can be made up until August 10 2014. Read more: thelocal.fr ASIA & THE PACIFIC Stories curated by Lonely Planet’s Asia & the Pacific Destination Editors: Megan Eaves, Sarah Reid, Joe Bindloss, Laura Crawford and Tasmin Waby. Hikers in Son Doong cave. Image by Doug Knuth / CC BY-SA 2.0 Tours inside world’s largest cave booked out Travellers hoping to visit Vietnam’s Son Doong, the world’s largest known cave, will have to be patient as tours are fully booked until 2015, according to tourism officials. Son Doong was first opened to the public in 2013, with limited organised tours the only way for visitors to enter the cave. Read more: thanhniennews.com Thai junta cracks down on visa runners Hopping over the border to get a 30-day extension on a tourist visa for Thailand is set to become a thing of the past, as the nation’s military junta tightens controls over foreigners entering the country…

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Beastly behaviour at London Zoo, American and Dutch citizens arrested in Kuwait for eating in public during Ramadan and Indian tribe hailed as the…

Get the best travel news here curated by Lonely Planet Destination Editors, who use their expertise to bring you the stories that matter from all over the world. In today’s edition: late-night events at London Zoo come under scrutiny after reports of animal harassment, nineteen arrested in Kuwait for eating in public during Ramadan, India’s Bishnoi tribe hailed as the original tree conservationists and Tokyo launches ‘Samurai and Ninja Safari’. Europe Asia & the Pacific The Americas Middle East & Africa Weird, odd & just plain fun YOUR WORLD TODAY 21 July is… Anniversary of the first moonwalk by Neil Armstrong, 1969 Liberation Day, Guam National Day, Belgium EUROPE Stories curated by Lonely Planet’s Europe Destination Editors: Jo Cooke, James Smart, Brana Vladisavljevic, Kate Morgan, Anna Tyler and Gemma Graham. Penguin enclosure, London Zoo. Image by Karen Roe / CC BY 2.0 London Zoo night events under spotlight after beastly behaviour London Zoo’s  Zoo Lates, Friday night events which see the iconic zoo open for food, drink  and comedy performances, have come under fire after reports of animal harassment. Incidents have included a woman hitting a bird, a man pouring beer on a tiger and a visitor stripping off before trying to enter the penguin enclosure. The evenings, which raise £800,000 a year, run from June to August. Read more: dailymail.co.uk Bulgaria’s new island attraction popular with tourists The Black Sea island of St Anastasia, near the town of Burgas, is the first Bulgarian island to become a tourist attraction. It was opened to visitors in May and so far it has attacted almost 15,000 tourists, according to officials.  The island has archaeological sites, a monastery and a small guesthouse. It can be reached by three daily boats from Burgas. Read more: novinite.com Village in Crete looking for new residents The village of Verekinthos near Chania, Crete, is looking for new residents. It has 35 arts and crafts laboratories and is inviting artists and craftsmen to settle permanently or rent about 10 currently empty workshops. The crafts produced in the other 20 workshops include ceramics, leather, glass, painting, sculpture, masks, traditional knives and more. Read more: greece.greekreporter.com Cornwall coast awash with Lego. Image by Benjamin Esham / CC BY-SA 2.0 Cornwall’s Lego curse Pieces of Lego are washing up on Cornish beaches, seventeen years after a freak wave deposited 4.8 million of them in the sea off Land’s End. In 1997 the wave knocked 62 containers off a cargo ship – among the cargo were 34,000 plastic dragons, 48,000 flippers and 4,200 octopuses. The plastic does not decompose and can poison birds. While most pieces have washed up in Cornwall, ocean currents mean some could show up anywhere in the world. Read more: bbc.co.uk Bathing ban for baking beachgoers Temperatures are soaring in Sweden but beachgoers in the south of the country won’t be able to cool down in the sea: authorities have been forced to stop visitors from entering the water at two of the most popular beaches in Malmö due to high levels of bacteria. Heavy rain in the preceding weeks has been blamed for the increase in bacteria and the waters will remain out of bounds for at least the next few days while further samples are tested. Read more: thelocal.se ASIA & THE PACIFIC Stories curated by Lonely Planet’s Asia & the Pacific Destination Editors: Megan Eaves, Sarah Reid, Joe Bindloss, Laura Crawford and Tasmin Waby. Malaysia Airlines. Image by Gordon Werner / CC BY 2.0 Malaysia Airlines passengers offered refunds until Thursday Malaysia Airlines customers have until Thursday to claim a full refund without financial penalty for travel throughout the rest of the year. The future of the embattled carrier, still reeling from the March disappearance of Flight 370, remains in doubt following the MH17 disaster last Thursday, which claimed the lives of all 298 people on board. Read more: smh.com.au Open House Melbourne this weekend Architecture and history buffs should note that Open House Melbourne is on this weekend with many buildings not normally open to the public available for free public viewings. In addition, Nite Art will see a range of art installations on view at various locations on July 23. Unrelated but also worth a look this week in Melbourne is the Gertrude Street Projection Festival at various locations in Melbourne’s inner north. Read more: broadsheet.com.au Typhoon Rammasun kills scores, Typhoon Matmo on the way Typhoon Rammasun has killed 112 people in China and the Philippines in the worst storm to hit mainland China in more than 40 years. Meanwhile, the Central Weather Bureau in Taiwan has issued a warning that Typhoon Matmo may hit the island on Tuesday, with the possibility for high winds and rogue waves. Read more: chinapost.com.tw China Eastern to trial country’s first in-flight wi-fi China Eastern Airlines will trial its new in-flight wi-fi service in what would become China’s first commercial airline wi-fi system. The trial will take place aboard an Airbus A330 from Shanghai to Beijing on Wednesday morning. Use of the system will be free during the trial period, but charges will apply once the system is in full use. Laptop – and tablet – users will be able to access the wi-fi, but mobile phones are still banned from use on flights in China. Read more: shanghaidaily.com India’s original tree huggers The Bishnoi tribe of Rajasthan has been hailed as the original conservationists because of their philosophy of protecting trees, a sensible measure in the arid Thar desert. Photographer Arindam Mukherjee has produced a photo story on the Bishnoi way of life for the BBC. Read more: bbc.co.uk Thai visa charge waived for Chinese and Taiwanese tourists. Image by J Aaron Farr / CC BY 2.0 Thailand to waive visa fees for Chinese and Taiwanese tourists In a bid to boost tourism in the face of political unrest, Thailand will exempt visa fees for both Chinese and Taiwanese visitors from August 1 to October 31. The regular visa entry fee for both regions is 1,000 baht…

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Eastern Ukrainian airspace closed, China on red alert for supertyphoon, hoard of gold recovered off South Carolina, auction of Mandela memorabilia on…

Get the best travel news here curated by Lonely Planet Destination Editors, who use their expertise to bring you the stories that matter from all over the world. In today’s edition: The airspace over Eastern Ukraine remains closed after the Malaysia airlines crash, China is bracing itself for the arrival of a supertyphoon, a hoard of gold rush-era gold has been recovered off South Carolina and a charity auction has sold unusual Nelson Mandela memorabilia. Europe Asia & the Pacific The Americas Middle East & Africa Weird, odd & jus Continue reading

t plain fun YOUR WORLD TODAY 18 July is… Festa Italiana, celebrating Italian heritage at cities across America Constitution Day, Uruguay Nelson Mandela Day EUROPE Stories curated by Lonely Planet’s Europe Destination Editors: Jo Cooke, James Smart, Brana Vladisavljevic, Kate Morgan, Anna Tyler and Gemma Graham. Malaysia airlines. Image by Alec Wilson / CC BY-SA 2.0 Airspace of eastern Ukraine closed to civil aircraft Ukrainian authorities have closed the airspace of eastern Ukraine to civil aircraft until further notice after Malaysian Airlines flight MH17 from Amsterdam to Kuala Lumpur crashed near the town of Torez in the Donetsk region of eastern Ukraine on July 17. Immediately after the crash commercial airlines diverted their flights over Ukrainian airspace while many were already avoiding flying over eastern Ukrainian territory. The crashed Malaysian aircraft was using the most common route for flights between Europe and Southeast Asia. British Airways, Lufthansa and Air France have not cancelled their flights to Kyiv as this destination is not near the affected region. Read more: edition.cnn.com Paris’ Seine-side beaches open for summer This weekend the banks of the Seine will be transformed into sandy beaches complete with deck chairs, ice-cream stands and concerts as the annual Paris Plages (Paris Beaches) open. The beaches will be at three spots along the river: Louvre/Pont de Sully, Port de la Gare and Bassin de la Villette and open from 9am to midnight until August 17. Read more: paris.fr Mont Blanc, France. Image by Olivier Bain / CC BY 2.0 More deaths prompt a call for restrictions on climbing Mont Blanc France’s Mont Blanc, considered one of the world’s most dangerous mountains, has already claimed three lives just one month into the peak summer climbing season. This has renewed calls for restrictions on climbing the mountain which attracts around 30,000 people a year. Currently there is no permit required or fee charged. Read more: thelocal.fr Oil spill off Canary Islands An oil spill is affecting marine life off the coast of Gran Canaria in the Canary Islands. The spill is thought to have originated from a passing boat and scientists are assessing damage to the recently designated nature preserve of Arinaga. Bathing beaches have apparently not been affected. Read more: elpais.com  Road workers destroy Norwegian monument. Image by Courtney Rhodes / CC BY 2.0 Bungling contractors sued for destroying ancient Norwegian monument The culture protection chief of Nordland, Norway, is to sue a construction company after its sub-contractors toppled a 1000-year-old stone when clearing a road in Steigen. The monument on Engeløya island is thought to have marked a burial ground or served as a border between settlements and is a popular attraction in the area. Although the monument is currently in three parts due to the accident, the local mayor has vowed to see the six-metre–tall stone reinstated. Read more: thelocal.no Falkland Islands’ landscapes and wildlife revealed in new exhibition The Falkland Islands, in the South Atlantic, are best known for the 1982 conflict between between Britain and Argentina – which disputes Britain’s sovereignty and refers to the islands as Las Malvinas. A series of photos by residents on show in London reveals another side to the islands and features albatrosses, penguins, seals, wake-boarders and evocative landscapes. Read more: bbc.co.uk ASIA & THE PACIFIC Stories curated by Lonely Planet’s Asia & the Pacific Destination Editors: Megan Eaves, Sarah Reid, Joe Bindloss, Laura Crawford and Tasmin Waby. The aftermath of Typhoon Rammasun in the Philippines. Image by Brian Candy / CC BY 2.0 Supertyphoon headed for southern China China has issued a red alert, its highest, as Supertyphoon Rammasun bears down on the southern provinces. The typhoon is expected to make landfall on Friday battering Hainan and Guangdong provinces with sustained winds of up to 240 kilometres per hour. Read more: cnn.com Nepali sherpas denied permission to clean up Matterhorn Sherpas from Nepal have been denied permission to repair climbing trails on the Matterhorn because of a mix up over immigration paperwork. The sherpas were invited to Switzerland as part of the 150th anniversary celebrations for the first ascent of the Matterhorn and were expected to demonstrate traditional, environmentally-friendly techniques for maintaining mountain trails. Read more: reuters.com Environmentalists rally against Phuket dolphinarium Phuket’s local dive community have launched a social media campaign in opposition to a dolphinarium reportedly being built near Phuket Zoo. It’s thought that three wild female Pacific bottlenose dolphins destined for the facility were trapped in Taiji, Japan earlier this year. Read more: phuketwan.com Heavy snow expected in New Zealand Travellers crossing alpine passes on New Zealand’s South Island between Canterbury and the West Coast are advised to take care over the weekend as heavy snow is forecast. Motorists using Arthur’s, Lindis, Lewis and Porter’s passes should expect snow showers on Friday night and possibly Saturday morning. Read more: radionz.co.nz THE AMERICAS Stories curated by Lonely Planet’s Americas Destination Editors: Clifton Wilkinson, Dora Whitaker, Alex Howard and MaSovaida Morgan. Treasure trove. Image by Tom Garnett / CC BY 2.0 Hoard of Gold Rush gold recovered from shipwreck off South Carolina A hoard of Californian Gold Rush-era gold worth millions has been recovered from a 19th-century shipwreck off the coast of South Carolina. The stash has been lying in the wreck of the SS Central America since it sank in a hurricane in 1857 and includes gold bars, double-eagle gold coins and eagle gold coins. …

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Spanish beach shut in shark alert, militants attack Kabul airport, DC decriminalises possession of marijuana, Bahrain bans alcohol in three star…

Get the best travel news here curated by Lonely Planet Destination Editors, who use their expertise to bring you the stories that matter from all over the world. In today’s edition: Barcelona beaches have been shut after shark sightings in the area, militants attack Kabul airport, possession of marijuana is decriminalised in Washington DC and Bahrain has banned alcohol in three star hotels. Europe Asia & the Pacific The Americas Middle East & Africa YOUR WORLD TODAY 17 July is… Constitution Day, South Korea The King’s Birthday, Lesotho Independence Day, Slovakia EUROPE Stories curated by Lonely Planet’s Europe Destination Editors: Jo Cooke, James Smart, Brana Vladisavljevic, Kate Morgan, Anna Tyler and Gemma Graham. Sharks in Spain – a sight now not exclusive to the Barcelona Aquarium. Image by fhwrdh / CC BY 2.0 Barcelona beaches shut after sharks spotted Barcelona’s beaches were shut for a second day yesterday after sharks were spotted swimming close to shore. On Tuesday a lifeguard spotted a five-foot blue shark off Barcelona and further sharks were then discovered nearby. Read more: nbcnews.com New London board game cafe continues trend for niche venues It already has a cat cafe and a pay-as-you-go cafe and now London is getting a specialist board games cafe. Draughts, which is due to open in Hackney in September, will offer 500 different games as well as a range of food and drink. The board games range from Monopoly and Scrabble to more niche titles like Hanabi, Power Grid and Chicken Cha Cha Cha. Read more: timeout.com Dublin goes country after Brooks fiasco Dublin aims to satisfy frustrated Garth Brooks fans with a ‘City & Western’ weekend. The country megastar was to play to 400,000 fans over five nights in Croke Park, but the concerts were cancelled after Dublin City Council only granted licenses for three shows, costing the city an estimated €50 million euro. July 25-27 will see country and roots gigs, an ‘OK Corral’ busking trail, square dancing lessons and plenty of hay and gingham. Read more: Irish Times Sixty photos to honour Angela Merkel’s birthday German Chancellor Angela Merkel has turned 60 and to celebrate, a museum in Berlin is to display 60 photos captured during her time in politics. All of the images were taken by Bild photographer Daniel Biskup who described the leader as ‘very photogenic’. The exhibition will be on display at Museum The Kennedys until August 17. Read more: thelocal.de Authorities crack down on makeshift ‘public Jacuzzi’. Image by Andy Rogers / CC BY-SA 2.0 Authorities burst the bubble of dishwashing liquid jacuzzis For years locals and tourists alike have been creating a public jacuzzi by pouring dishwashing liquid into the Nævra waterfall in Sør-Trøndelag, Norway. But authorities are now clamping down on the practice – which is already illegal – as it’s threatening local salmon populations. Fish and ‘bottom-dwellers’ alike are harmed by the chemicals found in soap and the municipality’s environmental advisor said, ‘We will do everything necessary to stop this.’ Read more: newsinenglish.no France introduces new law to help improve the restaurant scene Restaurants throughout France will now have to state on their menus whether their food is homemade after a new ‘fait maison’ law came into effect this week. The aim of the law is to improve the mid-range restaurant scene which has come under criticism for using factory-made shortcuts in the kitchen. However some chefs argue this is a ‘catch-all’ law and hard to define what constitutes homemade. Read more: theguardian.com Protaras resort, Cyprus. Image by George M. Groutas / CC BY 2.0 Tourist outrage over puppy crushed to death at a hotel in Cyprus A puppy was killed in in the resort of Protaras, Cyprus after being disposed of by Anastasia Beach Hotel staff in a recycling bin fitted with a crushing mechanism. Tourists found the puppy still alive but with extreme injuries and it died within days. Tourists called for a boycott of the hotel and started a petition for Cyprus to enforce animal cruelty laws. Travel operator Thomas Cook and the Tsokkos Hotels Group have condemned the incident stating that the responsible staff members were dismissed. The president of Cyprus, Nicos Anastasiades, called the incident a disgrace for the country. Read more: dailymail.co.uk  Mysterious giant crater discovered in Siberia A dark-coloured, 80m-wide crater has recently been discovered by helicopters flying over the Yamal peninsula in western Siberia. It is located near a forest approximately 30km from Yamal’s largest gas field. …

Luxurious Apartments in Venice at holiday velvet

Venice, The best destination of Europe, period!

Those seeking a top notch holiday in Europe will find that choosing to holiday in Venice and stay at one of the many luxurious apartments that are for rent make for the ideal vacation option.

VeniceApartmentsThe apartments have the Italian charm that one expects while visiting Venice and most have outstanding and amazing views and many others are located in close proximity to the top attraction found throughout Venice. It is a city like no other and one who opts for staying in an apartment versus a hotel will find that they will feel as if they are living there and truly getting the rare opportunity to experience all the city has to offer.

Some of the apartments in Venice for overlook or are a short walk to the infamous piazza San Marco which is one of the top draws for tourists. It is the one place that is as amazing to stand in and behold the first time as it is on the tenth. There is amazing architecture, sculptures and reminders of the historical importance of Venice all throughout.

St Mark’s Basilica is perhaps one of the most visibly recognizable landmark and historic places in Venice and many of the apartments one can rent have views of this cultural icon that is a reminder of the Byzantine history associated with Venice itself. This is a visit not to be missed by anyone traveling to Venice on holiday.

However, one of the most intriguing and fascinating aspects of Venice are those waterways that wind, weave and meander all throughout the city. It is a city where one can get around just about everyone by gondola if they so choose and the sight of those gondolas floating to and fro is simply breathtaking. Those who stay in rented Venice luxury apartments often have the best views of this classic element of the city that is known all over the world. It truly is a sight o behold and especially during busy periods when many colorful gondolas are moving about. It is even more charming and mesmerizing when one can relax on the balcony or porch of their rented Venice apartment and simply watch this top wonder of the world pass by right before their very eyes.

Whether dining out and shopping each day of ones holiday or buying fresh local foods and cooking inside of the apartment, staying in a rented apartment while visiting Venice truly is the best way to be in the heart of everything that is magical and memorable about the city itself.

 

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Oktoberfest preparations begin in Munich, Nepal’s fallen prince arrested again, UK travel advisories criticised, China hit by blasts

Get the best travel news here curated by Lonely Planet Destination Editors, who use their expertise to bring you the stories that matter from all over the world. In today’s edition: Oktoberfest preparations are already underway in Munich, former crown prince of Nepal arrested again for drug offences, Richard Branson has criticised UK’s travel advisory against Kenya and separate blasts in China have killed two and left dozens injured. Europe Asia & the Pacific The Americas Middle East & Africa Weird, odd & just plain fun YOUR WORLD TODAY 16 July is… The foundation day of the Islamic calendar, established 16 July 622 AD Anniversary of the first nuclear explosion, 1945, New Mexico, USA World Snake Day EUROPE Stories curated by Lonely Planet’s Europe Destination Editors: Jo Cooke, James Smart, Brana Vladisavljevic, Kate Morgan, Anna Tyler and Gemma Graham. Oktoberfest. Image by 46137 / CC BY 2.0 Oktoberfest preparations underway in Munich It may be only July, but organisers of Oktoberfest, the world’s largest beer festival, have already begun to prepare with the first tents being erected in Munich’s Theresienwiese. Running from September 20 to October 5, this year’s festival will see its first new beer tent in 30 years. Read more: thelocal.de Talking golden deer appear in Warsaw A new art installation in the form of talking golden deer has appeared outside the Palace of Culture and Science in Warsaw this week. Formerly used as props in the Dramatic Theatre based in the building, the deer ‘speak’ thoughts gathered from Warsaw residents about theatre in the city. The installation will remain until August 15 and the space will be used to host regularly changing art installations from then on. Read more: thenews.pl Athens’ National Archaeological Museum hosts week-long arts fest The National Archaeological Museum in Athens is hosting a week-long arts festival from July 16 – 24. The program includes music, children’s theatre and cinema. All events are admission-free and will take place at the museum’s outside area in the evenings. Read more: news.gtp.gr Vondelpark, Amsterdam. Image by Barbara Walsh / CC BY 2.0 Tulip Island opens in Amsterdam A new attraction has opened in Vondelpark in Amsterdam offering tourists the chance to pick their own tulips in July and August. The flowers usually bloom in spring so most visitors in the peak summer period miss out on them, but a method using ice preparation means they are now on offer in summer. Tulip Island also features a traditional auction clock. The attraction will be open until September 7. Read more: amsterdamtourist.info Málaga considers compensation after treasure hunt The Spanish city of Málaga is considering seeking compensation after a treasure hunt caused €2000 worth of damage to the city. The ‘Hidden Cash’ hunt required competitors to follow Twitter clues in order to find envelopes of cash hidden around the city. Plants were damaged in parks, cables pulled and rubbish overturned in the scramble for the cash. Read more: theguardian.com Imperial war museum reopens after major refit London’s Imperial War Museum is reopening on Saturday after a £40 million refit. The iconic four-storey museum features new displays to mark the centenary of World War I. Other exhibits include a walk-through prefab 1940s house, a jump jet, rockets that hang from the ceiling and a trunk owned by a Jewish couple who died at Auschwitz. Read more: bbc.co.uk  ASIA & THE PACIFIC Stories curated by Lonely Planet’s Asia & the Pacific Destination Editors: Megan Eaves, Sarah Reid, Joe Bindloss, Laura Crawford and Tasmin Waby. A marijuana plant. Image by Brett Levin / CC BY 2.0 Nepal’s fallen prince arrested again Paras Shah, the former crown prince of Nepal, has been arrested in Bangkok for possession of marijuana. This is the second time the errant royal has been nabbed for the same offence in Thailand. Once heir to the throne of Nepal, the prince has pursued an increasingly erratic lifestyle in exile since the abolition of the monarchy in 2008 with a string of arrests for drug and alcohol related offences. Read more: business-standard.com Blasts hit two Chinese provinces Dozens of people have been injured and two killed in two separate explosions in China. An explosion on a public bus in Guangzhou left two dead on Wednesday. A blast set off from a rubbish bin at Caojiabao airport in Xining, the capital city of Qinghai province, on Tuesday afternoon caused minor injuries. Service has resumed at Xining airport. Police are still investigating both incidents. Read more:  business-standard.com Rare piece of Korean lacquer art returned home An extremely rare piece of lacquer art – one of only nine left in the world – has been returned to South Korea. The piece, a sutra box inlaid with mother-of-pearl, dates to the Koryo dynasty (918-1392 BC) and will be the only Koryo lacquer piece in Korea. The National Museum of Korea plans to exhibit the box in the coming months. Read more: koreaherald.com Typhoon Rammasun rips through Philippines, heads for Hong Kong At least ten people were killed and nearly 370,000 displaced after Typhoon Rammasun, known locally as Glenda, made landfall in the Philippines on Tuesday. With the storm now tracking across the South China Sea, the Hong Kong Observatory has forecasted strong winds and occasional heavy rain for the next couple of days. Read more: scmp.com Autistic artist to recreate Singapore skyline from memory. Image by Matt Doughty / CC BY 2.0 World-renowned architectural artist takes up residence in Singapore’s Paragon mall Autistic British artist Stephen Wiltshire, famed for drawing detailed panoramic drawings of world cities from memory, will begin to recreate Singapore’s iconic cityscape on a giant canvas on Wednesday following a tour of the city. The artist can be seen in action in the main atrium of the Paragon mall until Sunday. Read more: straitstimes.com Adelaide property developers uncover ancient burial site The skull and ancient human remains found at a building site in Adelaide are believed to be historic Aboriginal remains…